Author Archives: cchmuseum

CCHM Speaker Series – Clark County Stories: Conversations with Women in Politics

Speaker Donna Sinclair, PhD

CCHM’s 2020 Speaker Series continues on Facebook Live Thursday, June 11 at 7 p.m., with Donna Sinclair in “Clark County Stories: Conversations with Women in Politics”.

In this presentation based on the Clark County Stories project conducted in partnership with WSU Vancouver, historians and scholars, Donna Sinclair and Sue Peabody, highlight a series of conversational interviews and discussions exploring and reflecting on the role women have played as political leaders in Clark County. Several women in Clark County politics participated in recorded discussions for this program, including former congresswoman and state legislator, Linda Smith, former state legislator and Clark County Councilor Betty Sue Morris, former Camas Mayor, Nan Henriksen, and former City Councilor, Pat Jollota.

Donna Sinclair, Ph.D. is an historian and scholar specializing in oral history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. Sinclair holds a Bachelor’s degree from Washington State University – Vancouver as well as a Master’s in History and Ph.D. in Urban Studies from Portland State University. She teaches as an adjunct for Washington State University Vancouver, served on the Washougal Planning Commission in 2017 and is on the Washougal School Board of Directors.

Dr. Susan Peabody is Meyer Distinguished Professor of History at Washington State University Vancouver. Her historical exhibit, “The Strange History de Furcy Madeleine,” about a slave who won his freedom in the courts of France and Britain, appears at the Musée de Villèle, Réunion Island, France.

The CCHM Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission and Wager Audio. In our effort to help slow the spread of COVID-19, this event will be streamed free on Facebook.

The Clark County Stories project is supported through the Pettyjohn Fund of the Department of History, Washington State University.

CCHM Speaker Series – “Mount St. Helens: 40 Years Later”

CCHM’s Speaker Series continues on Facebook Live Thursday, May 7th at 7 pm, with “Mount St. Helens: 40 Years Later”. Join CCHM Executive Director, Brad Richardson, as he looks back at the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens and the events surrounding that day.

During this month’s Speaker Series event, Brad will reflect on the most destructive volcanic eruption in U.S. history. He will discuss the past volcanic events around Clark County, the lead up to that faithful morning, as well as the short- and long-term economic and cultural impacts it had on the region.

The CCHM 2020 Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission and Wager Audio. In our effort to support social distancing, this event will be streamed free on Facebook.

If you would like to support the Speaker Series and other CCHM programming during this time, please consider a tax-deductible donation equal to the regular cost of admission to this event ($5 adults; $4 seniors & youth).

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

History on Tap Streaming Edition: History A-Brewin’ (Encore)

Missed January’s History on Tap “Clark County’s Brewing History: From Fort Vancouver to Fortside”? We’re bringing it back for an encore presentation, right to the comfort of your own home.

Join CCHM Executive Director, Brad Richardson, as he streams live from the Kiggins Theater on April 16th at 7pm. Learn all about brewing in the time of the Hudson’s Bay Company and Vancouver Barracks; the era of prohibition; the Women’s Christian Temperance Union; and the establishment and growth of Great Western Malting.

Have a history question you’d like to have answered? The ever popular segment, “Ask Pat,” is back! Post your question to CCHM’s Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter page (#AskPat) or email us at outreach@cchm.org. Local historian, Pat Jollata, will select one question to answer during the show.

Tickets can be purchased online at kigginstheatre.com/movies/history-on-tap. Ticket holders will receive a private link to the event prior to the show.

Audio support for History on Tap is provided by the Courtney Irvin Trust. Additional support is provided by Vancouver’s Downtown Association and ZZeppelin.

For more information, call the museum at 360-993-5679 or email at outreach@cchmuseum.org.

Property Research 101

Join Brad Richardson for this three-part virtual workshop where he walks you through the process of researching the history and developing a historical narrative for your property.

Cost: $15 Non-Members | $10 Members | $40 for the entire series

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES

In this online workshop, CCHM Executive Director Brad Richardson teaches you the tools and skills needed to do property research on historic residential properties. Learn how to use readily available online resources to uncover the history behind your home or property.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

In the second part of our series, Brad focuses on historic commercial properties to help you uncover the history behind your business or property. 

A portion of this workshop will briefly review tools introduced in our Residential Properties course. While not required, we recommend Property Research 101: Residential Properties

ONLINE RESOURCES

In the final installment of our workshop series, join Brad as he dives into how to access and use a variety of online archives to help you tell the story of your property.

This workshop is the final in a three-part series. While not required, we recommend Property Research 101: Residential Properties and/or Property Research 101: Commercial Properties.

HOW DO I PARTICIPATE?

CCHM online workshop are held on Zoom. Get the free Zoom app or you can sign in here https://zoom.us/signin. You’ll receive a link to join at least 30 minutes before class begins.

Women’s Suffrage in Southwest Washington

Group of women under a flowering tree. CCHM Historical Archives

Clark County Historical Museum continues our 2020 Speaker Series at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 5, with Tracy Kelly’s presentation of “Women’s Suffrage in Southwest Washington.” From the beginning of the Suffrage Movement through Washington States’ ratification of the 19th Amendment and into contemporary time, women in Southwest Washington have long been a driving force in the changing political landscape of the region.

Join us as Tracy tells the story of the women who led the fight for Women’s Rights in Southwest Washington. She’ll introduce listeners to major suffragists, explain why Oregon’s “Mother of Equal Suffrage”, Abigail Scott Duniway, found Vancouver’s doors closed to her, and explore why even after gaining the right to vote, women continue to fight for Equal Rights both locally and nationally.

According to Tracy, “It was a splendid opportunity to to work with the staff and researchers of CCHM on this celebration of the Votes for Women Centennial of the 19th Amendment. Historians are passionate about detective work – and we’ve uncovered intriguing new stories about the women of Clark County using original source material. I am excited to share this original research with the community.”

Honored as a Woman of Achievement by the YWCA of Clark County and Clark College in 2008, Tracy Reilly Kelly is the retired Program Manager for Clark College Economic and Community Development. Before becoming Program Manager, Tracy spent 16 years teaching Health, Human Sexuality and Women’s Health,and Women’s Studies at both Clark College and Portland State University. Originally a history major who wrote a thesis in college of the history of La Center, Tracy received her B.A. in Human Services from Evergreen State College and an M.S. in Teaching Health Education at Portland State University.

The CCHM Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission. General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free for CCHM members, veterans, and active-duty military personnel. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the event will begin at 7 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

CANCELLED! 2020 Community Conversations and Workshop series: Women and Politics

Election Card for Betsy Rae Ross (CCHM Digital Library)

Clark County Historical Museum and Washington State University – Vancouver are pleased to announce their 2020 Community Conversations and Workshop series happening from 12 pm to 2 pm on March 14 and March 28 at the Museum.

On Saturday, March 14, CCHM hosts Community Conversation: Women and Politics in Clark County. In this conversation, historians and scholars, Donna Sinclair and Sue Peabody, facilitate an open discussion exploring and reflecting on the role women play as political leaders in Clark County. Several women in Clark County politics will be part of a panel, including former state legislator and Clark County Councilor Betty Sue Morris, former Camas Mayor, Nan Henriksen, and former City Councilor, Pat Jollota. Many current and past women leaders will also be present.

Sinclair returns to CCHM on Saturday, March 28, for Women’s Stories: A Writing Workshop, where participants unlock and share their personal stories as leaders and women in the community.

“We are excited to facilitate the stories women have to tell about their lives and community. I am especially thrilled to share what we have learned about the challenges and issues of political life from women like Betty Sue Morris, Pat Jollota, and Nan Henriksen. I can’t think of a more timely or important set of conversations to have than these as we look back on the anniversary of women getting the vote.”

Donna Sinclair, Ph.D. is an historian and scholar specializing in oral history and the history of the Pacific Northwest. Sinclair holds a Bachelor’s degree from Washington State University – Vancouver as well as a Master’s in History and Ph.D. in Urban Studies from Portland State University. She teaches as an adjunct for Washington State University Vancouver, served on the Washougal Planning Commission in 2017 and is on the Washougal School Board of Directors.

Dr. Susan Peabody is Meyer Distinguished Professor of History at Washington State University Vancouver. Her historical exhibit, “The Strange History de Furcy Madeleine,” about a slave who won his freedom in the courts of France and Britain, appears at the Musée de Villèle, Réunion Island, France.

This event is free and museum admission is waived for participants. Registration is not required but space is limited. CCHM encourages participants to RSVP to secure a spot.

The 2020 Community Conversations and Workshop series is part of Clark County Historical Museum’s ongoing celebration of women’s history and the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment leading up to the Friday, August 21, opening of our newest exhibit (Her)story: Founders, Leaders, and Visionaries.

The Community Conversation and workshop are sponsored by “Clark County Stories: Women, Suffrage, and Politics,” through the Pettyjohn Fund of the Department of History, Washington State University.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

Buffalo Soldiers in Clark County


February CCHM Speaker Series presenter Frazier Raymond, right, stands with the late Bill Morehouse, founding member of the Buffalo Soldiers – Moses Williams Pacific Northwest Chapter.

Clark County Historical Museum will launch its 2020 Speaker Series on Thursday, Feb. 6, with Frazier Raymond’s presentation of “Buffalo Soldiers in Clark County.” Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the event will begin at 7 p.m.

Raymond is president of the Buffalo Soldiers – Moses Williams Pacific Northwest Chapter, 9th and 10th U.S. Cavalry Association. Raymond enlisted in the U.S. Army Infantry in 1968 and retired in 1990, with the rank of Staff Sergeant. He served in many locations, including Vietnam, Fort Lewis, WA, Europe, and South America.

“When I was in the Army, before I retired, I did not know much about the Buffalo Soldiers,” Raymond said. “It was only after I retired and joined the Buffalo Soldiers – Moses Williams Chapter that I found out how similar our experiences were. I look forward to telling this story.”

For the Speaker Series event, Raymond will discuss his own military service and involvement with the Buffalo Soldiers, and reflect on his personal connections to sites related to Buffalo Soldiers in the Pacific Northwest and how those experiences have shaped his perspectives on military service.

To learn more about the Buffalo Soldiers – Moses Williams Pacific Northwest Chapter, 9th and 10th U.S. Cavalry Association, visit buffalosoldierspdx.com/Pacific_NW_Chapter.html.

The CCHM Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission. General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free for CCHM members, veterans, and active-duty military personnel. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

National Unpublished Writers’ Day

Clark County Historical Museum, with Artstra, Rose City Book Pub, and Washington State University Vancouver will celebrate writing and Richard Brautigan during the 2020 National Unpublished Writers’ Day event at the Museum on Saturday, January 25, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event will be free and open to the public.

Planned activities include readings, workshops on writing and publishing, and information and activities for writers of all ages. “National Unpublished Writers Day will highlight a broad approach to writing for Museum visitors,” said Bradley Richardson, museum executive director.

“We are truly honored to be a part of this year’s National Unpublished Writers’ Day,” said Artstra chair, Karen Madsen. “By bringing together emerging and established writers, this event aligns perfectly with our organization’s goal of supporting local artists and encouraging arts accessibility. This is just one more way to help writers find their voice and gain confidence and to ensure the arts thrive in our community.”

“Internationally acclaimed writer Richard Brautigan was born here in Washington,” said John Barber, faculty at Washington State University Vancouver, a Brautigan scholar, and curator of the Museum’s Brautigan Library collection. “He suffered many rejections before achieving success as a writer. The Brautigan Library celebrates Brautigan’s vision and perseverance by providing a place where interested writers can share their narratives, regardless of content or quality. National Unpublished Writers Day celebrates this collection, its mission, and Brautigan’s birthday, Jan. 30, 1935, in Tacoma,” Barber said.

More about the Brautigan Library

(Her)Story: Founders, Leaders, and Visionaries

OPENING FRIDAY, AUG. 21, 2020

In celebration of women’s history and the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the Clark County Historical Museum is opening “(Her)Story: Founders, Leaders, and Visionaries,” an exhibit exploring the significant impact women have made on Clark County history.

From time immemorial, women have played a major role in the building and growth of communities in Clark County and Southwest Washington. Today, many women in all facets of our community carry this legacy forward. To examine yesterday and today, we will explore the following: Native American Nations, Hudson’s Bay Company, Vancouver Barracks, early and continuing communities, community organizations, legislative movements, and much more.

For $50, you can become a “Yellow Rose” sponsor for this exhibit. Please visit
cchmuseum.ejoinme.org/yellow-rose for more information.

2020 Program

Click HERE to purchase tickets for the next History on Tap.

Clark County Historical Museum unites history and hops as part of its interactive program, “History on Tap.” Each event features a trivia quiz, a Q&A segment, a talk on a popular historical topic, and — of course — a selection of local brews. Events are held at the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver, 1011 Main Street. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the event begins at 7 p.m.

Admission to “History on Tap” is $15 in advance, or $18 the day of the event. Tickets can be purchased at the Kiggins Theatre Box Office, the Clark County Historical Museum, or online at kigginstheatre.com/movies/history-on-tap. Audio support for “History on Tap” is provided by the Courtney Irvin Trust. Additional support is provided by Vancouver’s Downtown Association and ZZeppelin.

January 16: Clark County’s Brewing History — From Fort Vancouver to Fortside

This presentation will serve as a public introduction to the museum’s upcoming exhibit, “History A-Brewin’,” which will celebrate Clark County’s extensive brewing history and commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of prohibition. For the event, keynote speaker and CCHM executive director Brad Richardson will discuss brewing in the time of the Hudson’s Bay Company and Vancouver Barracks; the era of prohibition; the Women’s Christian Temperance Union; and the establishment and growth of Great Western Malting.

April 16: Women’s Suffrage in Washington State

July 16: Music, Movement, and Sound: An exploration of Clark County’s musical roots

October 15: Campfire Tales 2 — The haunting history of Clark County

Presented by local historians Brad Richardson, Pat Jollota, and Jeff Davis, this talk will explore the modern folklore of Clark County through historical interpretations, personal stories, and folktales related to our history and various haunting accounts.

Nominations

Summit Grove Lodge added to Washington Heritage Register

Summit Grove Inn, 1973

Ridgefield’s iconic Summit Grove Lodge is now recognized by the Washington Heritage Register following a nomination put forth by the Clark County Historical Museum.

The Washington Heritage Register is maintained by the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP) and includes districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that have been identified and documented as being significant in local or state history, architecture, archaeology, engineering or culture.

“Having a property listed in the register is an honor,” said Allyson Brooks, State Historic Preservation Officer with DAHP. “[Summit Grove Lodge] joins over 1,500 other historic and culturally significant properties which have been recognized for their unique contributions to Washington’s heritage.”

In the 1920s, the Summit Grove property became a stop for travelers using service stations and auto parks on the Pacific Highway. Notable guests included George Brent, Oliver Hardy, and Shirley Temple. The lodge has retained its signature rustic architectural style from its original construction in the 1920s, and is the only remaining example of the “Naturalism” movement of the early 20th century tied to the auto-tourism phenomenon in Clark County.

Margaret Colf Hepola and her sons, Bob and Dick Colf, purchased the property in 2009. The Colf family maintains an event and restaurant business at the site, and continues to preserve the history and memory of the prominent local and national figures associated with Summit Grove.

“We are honored to have Summit Grove Lodge included in the Washington State historic registry,” Dick Colf said. “Our mother had a strong desire to preserve and restore this part of our community’s history when we purchased the lodge in 2009. We are so please to see it now recognized as one of the state’s valued historic locations.”

Summit Grove Lodge joins a line-up of historical sites successfully nominated to heritage registers by the CCHM. In 2019, sites added to the Clark County Heritage Register following CCHM nominations included the Parkersville National Historic Site in Washougal, and the 1963 Fort Vancouver Regional Library building.

“The preservation of Clark County’s spaces is a foundational principle of the Clark County Historical Society,” said CCHM Executive Director Brad Richardson. “More than 100 years ago, a group of locals founded our historical society and united to save the Covington House. We continue to put forth these efforts in stewardship and partnership to honor our commitment to the preservation of community memory.”

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or info@cchmuseum.org

Camas-Washougal Community Chest awards $110K in grants
(Camas-Washougal Post Record, Mar. 12, 2020)

Clark County Historical Museum, ilani brew up good time
(The Columbian, Jan. 17, 2020)

History on tap at Clark County’s new brewing exhibit
(KOIN 6, Jan. 12, 2020)

Kiggins Theatre Hosts History on Tap with a look back at beer in the Northwest
(Fox 12 KPTV – Good Day Oregon, Jan. 10, 2020)

Clark County Museum Opens Brew History Exhibit
(Fox 12 KPTV – Good Day Oregon, Jan. 10, 2020)

County Council awards $50,000 in 2020 historical promotion grants
(The Reflector, Jan. 6, 2020)

Clark County Council awards $50,000 in grants to promote local history
(The Columbian, Jan. 4, 2020)

Summit Grove Lodge in Ridgefield earns spot on Washington Heritage Register
(The Columbian, Nov. 24, 2019)

Vancouver Facebook group ‘living, breathing archive of the community’s knowledge’”
(The Columbian, Nov. 7, 2019)

Clark County Historical Museum exhibit navigates river transportation, education
(The Columbian, Oct. 13, 2019)

Clark County Historical Museum opens exhibit on the history of rivers, roads and ports
(The Reflector, Sept. 23, 2019)

Clark County Historical Museum walking tours kick off next weekend
(Clark County Today, May 25, 2019)

Celebration of Vancouver poet Mary Barnard this afternoon
(The Columbian, April 13, 2019)

This might be the world’s only library of unpublished manuscripts: Vancouver’s Brautigan Library honors a Northwest literary icon
(The Seattle Times, April 10, 2019)

Kiggins – the man, his movie theater – focus of history talk
(The Columbian, April 4, 2019)

Interactive exhibit features work from 40 partners, explores roots
(The Columbian, March 24, 2019)

Longtime Ridgefield resident’s experiences as nurse turned into book
(The Columbian, March 7, 2019)

What was it like as a WWII nurse in Vancouver?
(The Reflector, Feb. 25, 2019)

Vancouver NAACP hosts numerous events for Black History month
(The Columbian, Jan. 25, 2019)

Series at Kiggins pours its all into local beer, brewing history
(The Columbian, Jan. 11, 2019)

Fitting launch: Brewski history focus of inaugural ‘History on Tap’ event
(The Reflector, Dec. 24, 2018)

Bus tours of Vancouver to focus on city’s history
(The Columbian, Dec. 3, 2018)

Vancouver talk to explore Native American music
(The Columbian, Oct. 30, 2018)

Clark County Museum offering walking tours through time this summer
(Clark County Today, May 26, 2018)

Clark County Historical Museum celebrates Mother Joseph’s legacy
(The Columbian, Feb. 28, 2018)

Clark County Historical Museum sheds light on Civil War
(The Columbian, April 2, 2014)

Shadows of Conflict at CCHM
(North Bank Now, March 28, 2014)

Clark County Historical Museum presents haunted history tour
(The Columbian, Oct. 5, 2013)

________________________________________________________________________________

What does Veterans Day mean to our veterans?

A Grand Army of the Republic group in Orchards, Washington (CCHM photo)

In honor of National Veterans and Military Families Month, Clark County Historical Museum will conclude its 2019 First Thursday Speaker Series on Thursday, Nov. 7, with “What does Veterans Day mean to our veterans?” Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the event will begin at 7 p.m.

This presentation will feature local veterans, including leaders and members with Vancouver’s Community Military Appreciation Committee (CMAC). Speakers will reflect on their military service, life since retiring from military service, and the meaning and personal significance of Veterans Day. Area veterans are encouraged to attend and share their own thoughts on Veterans Day during the audience discussion following the panel presentation.

In addition to Patrick Locke and Richard McHugh, who each served tours in Vietnam, the panel will also include CMAC board member Sean Gibson as moderator.

Gibson, who grew up in Bethel, Alaska, enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserves in 1988 as an infantryman, then earned his commission in 1990. He served for six years as an infantry officer with deployments to the Middle East, Okinawa, and the Western Pacific, and as a recruit training supervisor and operations officer. For the last 20 years of his career, Gibson served as a public affairs officer in a variety of assignments in the United States with deployments to Kuwait and Iraq. He retired in 2016 from Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C., then immediately put the Pentagon in his rearview mirror to drive west and settle with his wife and son in Vancouver.

The CCHM First Thursday Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission. General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free for veterans, active-duty military personnel and their families, and CCHM members. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or events@cchmuseum.org.

History A-Brewin’: Vancouver Brewing History

Clark County Historical Museum is taking its First Thursday Speaker Series to Vancouver’s Loowit Brewing Company, 507 Columbia Street, for “History A-Brewin’: Vancouver Brewing History.” This free event will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3.

This presentation will serve as a public introduction to the museum’s upcoming exhibit, opening in January 2020, celebrating Clark County’s extensive brewing history and commemorating the 100th anniversary of the start of prohibition.

CCHM Executive Director and event moderator Brad Richardson will begin the program by offering a brief overview of Vancouver’s brewing history with a focus on Lucky Lager Brewery and Great Western Malting. The program will then transition to a panel presentation featuring locals associated with these organizations and brewing in Clark County. Presenters include Sue Abbott, Carl Mullen Jr., Bryan Shull, and Tim Starkey.

Sue Abbott is the logistics manager for Great Western Malting, having been with the company’s Vancouver site for 36 years.

Carl Mullen Jr. began working for Vancouver’s Lucky Lager in 1972, filling the role of executive vice president. Mullen later assumed the role of president and was with the company until the Vancouver site closed in 1985.

Bryan Shull is the owner-operator of Trap Door Brewing in Vancouver. His grandfather and father made their careers at Great Western Malting, where Shull also worked for a time during college.

Tim Starkey worked in the operations portion of Lucky Lager for four years, and was present when the Vancouver location closed in the mid-1980s.

The CCHM First Thursday Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or events@cchmuseum.org.

History A-Brewin’

The story of brewing, distilling, temperance, and prohibition in Clark County and Southwest Washington started long ago. Dr. John McLoughlin grew barley and used a large portion of it for brewing in 1826; Star Brewery would begin its production of beer in 1890; and, many longtime residents remember the large “L” of Lucky Lager that ended its 35-year run in 1985. Today, brewers, distillers, and winemakers in Clark County have turned to a craft and artisan style that creates beverages of unparalleled quality. However, the road for these industries has not always been paved with Hop Gold.

To showcase the fascinating history of beer, liquor, and the 100th anniversary of the 18th Amendment, we will explore the following: brewing in the time of the Hudson’s Bay Company, the multitude of early breweries and brewers (such as Henry Weinhard), prohibition, the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, Dry vs. Wet counties and states, the transformation of bars and pubs, and the contemporary brewing and distilling scene in Clark County.

To tell these stories, we will employ the use of interpretative panels surrounded by interactive display cases and other visual guides. The panels will tell a story through text, historical photographs and images, while the display cases and other mediums will invite the patron to not only use sight, but also touch and smell.

Beyond the objects in our own collection, other museums, businesses, and historical organizations will be involved in this exhibit. The intent is for the exhibit to be representative of the entire county and drive people to visit these other amazing sites.

The goal of this exhibit is to produce an educational and engaging exploration of Clark County’s brewing and distilling story from yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Visitors will not only discover the narrative and living history of this important industry in Clark County and Southwest Washington, but maybe change the flavor profile of this area in the future.


For only $100, you can have your name printed on a beer bottle and featured in our upcoming “History A-Brewin” exhibit!
Visit cchmuseum.ejoinme.org/99bottles to become a sponsor!

THANK YOU TO OUR EXHIBIT SPONSORS: